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Johansson, Lennart B. A. and Karolin, J. and Langhals, Heinz and Reichherzer, N. and Füner, N. von and Polborn, K. (1993): Photophysics, Molecular Reorientation in Solution and X-Ray Structure of a New Fluorescent Probe 1,7-Diazaperylene. In: Journal of the Chemical Society, Faraday Transactions 1, Vol. 89: pp. 49-54
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Abstract

A new fluorescent molecule 1,7-diazaperylene (DP) has been investigated by means of time-resolved and steady-state polarized fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as X-ray spectroscopy. Absorption and fluorescence spectra of DP in solution are similar to those of perylene. However, absorption and fluorescence spectra of 2,8-dimethoxy DP and 2,8-dipentyloxy DP in solution are red-shifted by ca. 55 nm relative to perylene. The fluorescence decay of DP is exponential with a lifetime of 5.1 ns in ethanol, 4.9 ns in glycerol and 4.3 ns in paraffin oil. The radiative lifetime in ethanol was calculated to be 6.3 ns for DP, 8.0 ns for 2,8-dimethoxy DP and 7.6 ns for 2,8-dipentyloxy DP. The calculated fluorescence quantum yields of 0.8 for DP and its alkoxy derivatives in ethanol, are in good agreement with those obtained from measurements. The calculated Förster radius is 37.2 ± 1 Å for DP and 41.9 ± 1 Å for its alkoxy derivatives in ethanol. Examining the S0 S1 transition, we obtain a limiting fluorescence anisotropy of r0 0.38 for DP and its alkoxy derivatives. The rotational rates of DP in paraffin oil and glycerol were compared to that of perylene. In paraffin oil both molecules show an almost identical biexponential decay of the fluorescence anisotropy, which is compatible with a rotational motion like an oblate ellipsoid. The fluorescence anisotropy is monoexponential for DP in glycerol, and DP appears to rotate like a spherical particle while perylene in glycerol appears to rotate like an oblate ellipsoid. Moreover, the rotational diffusion constant, corresponding to rotation about an axis in the aromatic plane (D), is the same for both DP and perylene in glycerol.