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Klein, H. H. and Matthaei, S. and Drenkhan, M. and Ries, W. and Scriba, Peter Christian (1991): The relationship between insulin binding, insulin activation of insulin-receptor tyrosine kinase, and insulin stimulation of glucose uptake in isolated rat adipocytes. Effects of isoprenaline. In: Biochemical Journal, Vol. 274: pp. 787-792
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Abstract

We have studied the relationship between insulin activation of insulin-receptor kinase and insulin stimulation of glucose uptake in isolated rat adipocytes. Glucose uptake was half-maximally or maximally stimulated, respectively, when only 4% or 14% of the maximal kinase activity had been reached. To investigate this relationship also under conditions where the insulin effect on activation of receptor kinase was decreased, the adipocytes were exposed to 10 microM-isoprenaline alone or with 5 micrograms of adenosine deaminase/ml. An approx. 30% (isoprenaline) or approx. 50% (isoprenaline + adenosine deaminase) decrease in the insulin effect on receptor kinase activity was found at insulin concentrations between 0.4 and 20 ng/ml, and this could not be explained by decreased insulin binding. The decreased insulin-effect on kinase activity was closely correlated with a loss of insulin-sensitivity of glucose uptake. Moreover, our data indicate that the relation between receptor kinase activity and glucose uptake (expressed as percentage of maximal uptake) remained unchanged. The following conclusions were drawn. (1) If activation of receptor kinase stimulates glucose uptake, only 14% of the maximal kinase activity is sufficient for maximal stimulation. (2) Isoprenaline decreases the coupling efficiency between insulin binding and receptor-kinase activation, this being accompanied by a corresponding decrease in sensitivity of glucose uptake. (3) Our data indicate that the signalling for glucose uptake is closely related to receptor-kinase activity, even when the coupling efficiency between insulin binding and kinase activation is altered. They thus support the hypothesis that receptor-kinase activity reflects the signal which originates from the receptor and which is transduced to the glucose-transport system.