DeutschClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings
Blasi, Francesco; Garau, Javier; Medina, Jesus; Avila, Marco; McBride, Kyle; Ostermann, Helmut; REACH Study Grp, : Current management of patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia across Europe: outcomes from REACH. In: Respiratory Research 2013, 14:44




Background: Data describing real-life management and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Europe are limited. REACH (NCT01293435) was a retrospective, observational study collecting data on the management of EU patients hospitalized with CAP. The purpose of this study was to understand patient and disease characteristics in patients hospitalized with CAP and to review current clinical practices and outcomes. Methods: Patients were aged >= 18 years, hospitalized with CAP between March 2010 and February 2011, and requiring in-hospital treatment with intravenous antibiotics. An electronic Case Report Form was used to collect patient, disease and treatment variables, including type of CAP, medical history, treatment setting, antibiotics administered and clinical outcomes. Results: Patients (N = 2,039) were recruited from 128 centres in ten EU countries (Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Turkey, UK). The majority of patients were aged >= 65 years (56.4\%) and had CAP only (78.8\%). Initial antibiotic treatment modification occurred in 28.9\% of patients and was more likely in certain groups (patients with comorbidities; more severely ill patients; patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia, immunosuppression or recurrent episodes of CAP). Streamlining (de-escalation) of therapy occurred in 5.1\% of patients. Mean length of hospital stay was 12.6 days and overall mortality was 7.2\%. Conclusion: These data provide a current overview of clinical practice in patients with CAP in EU hospitals, revealing high rates of initial antibiotic treatment modification. The findings may precipitate reassessment of optimal management regimens for hospitalized CAP patients.