Logo Logo
Help
Contact
Switch Language to German
Choudhury, Arup Ratan; Choudhury, Kamrun Nahar; Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful (2016): Relationship of dental diseases with coronary artery diseases and diabetes in Bangladesh. In: Cardiovascular Diagnosis and therapy, Vol. 6, No. 2: pp. 131-137
Full text not available from 'Open Access LMU'.

Abstract

Background: Evidence suggests that dental diseases might have a role in the development and progression of coronary artery diseases (CAD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). The objective of this study was to determine the relationship of dental diseases with CAD and DM in Bangladesh. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 216 consecutive patients admitted in a tertiary hospital between March and July 2011. Data were collected on socio-demographic status, smoking, blood pressure (BP), diet, physical activities, and biochemical measurements of lipid profile, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, creatinine kinase MB (CK-MB), troponin, serum creatinine and serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT). CAD was detected using echocardiographic and coronary angiogram (CAG) reports. All patients underwent oral examination for dental disease. Relationship between dental disease with CAD and DM were explored statistically. Results: The mean age of the participants was 57.8 +/- 12.5 years and almost two-thirds (67.1%) were male. A great majority of the patients had CAD (90.3%) and type 2 DM (83.8%), and only 44% suffered from dental diseases. Less than one-third patients presented with acute myocardial infarction (MI), 23% with old MI, 11% unstable angina (UA) and 26.4% with non-ST elevation MI. Logistic regression results indicated that patients with DM and CAD had approximately 2.6 and 4.6 times more odds of association with dental diseases than those without DM and CAD (both P value <0.001). Conclusions: This study suggests a relationship of dental diseases with CAD and DM among Bangladeshi patients. Further studies are required to confirm these relationships in large clinical studies. Screening for CAD and DM should be considered among those with dental diseases and vice-versa.