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Kisser, U.; Kufeldt, J.; Adderson-Kisser, C.; Becker, S.; Baumeister, P.; Reiter, M.; Harréus, U.; Thomas, M. N.; Rittler, P. (2016): Clinical impact of malnutrition on complication rate and length of stay in elective ENT patients: a prospective cohort study. In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Vol. 273, No. 8: pp. 2231-2237
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Abstract

Malnutrition is considered as an independent risk factor for morbidity, mortality and a prolonged hospital stay for in-hospital patients. While most available data on the impact of malnutrition on health-related and financial implications refer to gastroenterologic or abdominal surgery patients, little is known about the impact of malnutrition on Ear Nose Throat (ENT)/head and neck surgery patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of malnutrition on morbidity and length of hospital stay in an elective ENT/head and neck surgery patient cohort. The study was performed as a single-center, prospective cohort study at a tertiary referral centre. Nutritional risk at admission was assessed using the NRS-2002 screening tool. Multivariate regression models were used to determine independent risk factors for complications and a prolonged hospitalization. Three hundred fifty one participants were included in the study. A malignant disease was found in 62 participants (17.7 %). 62 patients (17.7 %) were at a moderate to severe risk of malnutrition. A bad general health condition and complications during hospital stay could be identified as independent risk factors for a prolonged hospitalization. Patients with a malignant tumor showed a more than fourfold higher risk of developing at least one complication. Malnutrition, however, was not statistically associated with a higher complication rate or a prolonged hospital stay. Our data suggests that malnutrition does not seem to play such an important role as a risk factor for complications and a prolonged hospital stay in ENT patients as it does in other disciplines like abdominal surgery or gastroenterology.