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Topka, H.; Pfefferkorn, T.; Andres, F.; Kastrup, A.; Klein, M.; Niesen, W.; Poppert, H. (2017): Onlineumfrage zur Struktur der Notfallneurologie in Deutschland 2016. In: Nervenarzt, Vol. 88, No. 6: pp. 625-634
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Abstract

In 2007, the first poll among neurologists provided some insight into the organizational structures of emergency neurology in Germany. Given that emergency neurology as well as emergency medicine in general have undergone substantial changes during the last decade, the subcommittee Neurological Emergency Medicine of the German Neurological Society conducted a follow-up study to explore current structures supporting neurological emergency medicine in German neurological hospitals. Between July and September 2016, an online questionnaire was eaEuromailed to 675 neurologists in institutions participating in in-patient neurological care. Of these, some 32% (university hospitals 49%) answered. Neurological patients represent 12-16% and hence a significant proportion of emergency patients. The fraction of in-patients admitted to hospitals via emergency departments amounted to 78% (median) in general hospitals and 52% in university hospitals. Most emergency departments are organized as an interdisciplinary structure combining conservative with surgical disciplines frequently led by an independent department head. Neurology departments employ rather diverse strategies to organize neurological emergency care. Also, the way emergency patients are assigned to different disciplines varied largely. Currently, neurological patients represent a rather growing fraction of patients in emergency departments. An increasing proportion of neurology in-patients enter the hospital via emergency departments. Neurology departments in Germany face increasing challenges to cope with large numbers of neurological emergency patients. While most of the participating neurologists indicated suffering predominantly from scarce personal resources both in neurology and neuroradiology, an independent neurological emergency department was not considered an option.