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Heer, Tobias; Hochadel, Matthias; Schmidt, Karin; Mehilli, Julinda; Zahn, Ralf; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Hamm, Christian; Böhm, Michael; Ertl, Georg; Hoffmeister, Hans Martin; Sack, Stefan; Senges, Jochen; Massberg, Steffen; Gitt, Anselm K.; Zeymer, Uwe (2017): Sex Differences in Percutaneous Coronary Intervention-Insights From the Coronary Angiography and PCI Registry of the German Society of Cardiology. In: Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol. 6, No. 3, e004972
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Abstract

Background-Several studies have suggested sex-related differences in diagnostic and invasive therapeutic coronary procedures. Methods and Results-Data from consecutive patients who were enrolled in the Coronary Angiography and PCI Registry of the German Society of Cardiology were analyzed. We aimed to compare sex-related differences in in-hospital outcomes of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable coronary artery disease, non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes, ST elevation myocardial infarction, and cardiogenic shock. From 2007 until the end of 2009 data from 185 312 PCIs were prospectively registered: 27.9% of the PCIs were performed in women. Primary PCI success rate was identical between the sexes (94%). There were no sex-related differences in hospital mortality among patients undergoing PCI for stable coronary artery disease, non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes, or cardiogenic shock except among ST elevation myocardial infarction patients. Compared to men, women undergoing primary PCI for ST elevation myocardial infarction have a higher risk of in-hospital death, age-adjusted odds ratio (1.19, 95% CI 1.06-1.33), and risk of ischemic cardiac and cerebrovascular events (death, myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack/stroke), (age-adjusted odds ratio 1.19, 95% CI 1.16-1.29). Furthermore, accessrelated complications were twice as high in women, irrespective of the indication. Conclusions-Despite identical technical success rates of PCI between the 2 sexes, women with PCI for ST elevation myocardial infarction have a 20% higher age-adjusted risk of death and of ischemic cardiac and cerebrovascular events. Further research is needed to determine the reasons for these differences.