Logo Logo
Help
Contact
Switch Language to German
Hentrich, Marcus Ulrich; Bower, Mark; Daugaard, Gedske; Dieing, Annette; Bickel, Markus; Berretta, Massimiliano; Lesmeister, Florian; Jurinovic, Vindi; Stoehr, Albrecht; Heinzelbecker, Julia; Krznaric, Ivanka; Dieckmann, Klaus-Peter; Necchi, Andrea; Maroto Rey, Pablo; Brito, Margarida; Pfister, David; Hoffmann, Christian (2021): Outcomes of men with HIV and germ cell cancer: Results from an international collaborative study. In: Cancer [Forthcoming]
[img]
Preview
Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives 204kB

Abstract

BACKGROUND Previous studies have shown that men with HIV and germ cell cancer (HIV-GCC) have inferior overall survival (OS) in comparison with their HIV-negative counterparts. However, little information is available on treatments and outcomes of HIV-GCC in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). METHODS This study examined men living with HIV who were 18 years old or older and had a diagnosis of histologically proven germ cell cancer (GCC). The primary outcomes were OS and progression-free survival (PFS). RESULTS Data for 89 men with a total of 92 HIV-GCCs (2 synchronous GCCs and 1 metachronous bilateral GCC) were analyzed; among them were 64 seminomas (70%) and 28 nonseminomas (30%). The median age was 36 years, the median CD4 T-cell count at GCC diagnosis was 420 cells/µL, and 77% of the patients on cART had an HIV RNA load \textless 500 copies/mL. Stage I disease was found in 44 of 79 gonadal GCCs (56%). Among 45 cases with primary disseminated GCC, 78%, 18%, and 4% were assigned to the good-, intermediate-, and poor-prognosis groups, respectively, of the International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group. Relapses occurred in 14 patients. Overall, 12 of 89 patients (13%) died. The causes of death were refractory GCC (n = 5), an AIDS-defining illness (n = 3), and other causes (n = 4). After a median follow-up of 6.5 years, the 5- and 10-year PFS rates were 81% and 73%, respectively, and the 5- and 10-year OS rates were 91% and 85%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The 5- and 10-year PFS and OS rates of men with HIV-GCC were similar to those reported for men with HIV-negative GCC. Patients with HIV-GCC should be managed identically to HIV-negative patients. LAY SUMMARY Men living with HIV are at increased risk for germ cell cancer (GCC). Previous studies have shown that the survival of men with HIV-associated germ cell cancer (HIV-GCC) is poorer than the survival of their HIV-negative counterparts. This study examined the characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of 89 men with HIV-GCC in the era of effective combination antiretroviral therapies. The long-term outcomes of men with HIV-GCC were similar to those reported for men with HIV-negative GCC. Patients with HIV-GCC should be managed identically to HIV-negative patients.