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Stahler, Arndt; Heinemann, Volker; Neumann, Jens; Crispin, Alexander; Schalhorn, Andreas; Stintzing, Sebastian; Giessen-Jung, Clemens; Fischer von Weikersthal, Ludwig; Vehling-Kaiser, Ursula; Stauch, Martina; Quietzsch, Detlef; Holch, Julian W.; Kruger, Stephan; Haas, Michael; Michl, Marlies; Einem, Jobst von; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas; Modest, Dominik P. (2017): Prevalence and influence on outcome of HER2/neu, HER3 and NRG1 expression in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. In: Anti-cancer drugs, Vol. 28, No. 7: pp. 717-722
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Abstract

Our aim was to explore the impact of the HER2/neu, HER3 receptor as well as their ligands' neuregulin (NRG1) expression on the outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). NRG1, HER2/neu and HER3 expression was evaluated in 208 patients with mCRC receiving 5-FU/LV plus irinotecan or irinotecan plus oxaliplatin as the first-line treatment. Biomarker expression was correlated with the outcome of patients. NRG1 (low: 192 vs. high: 16), HER2/neu (low: 201 vs. high: 7) and HER3 (low: 69 vs. high: 139) expressions were assessed in 208 patients. High versus low NRG1 expression significantly affected progression-free survival (PFS) 4.7 vs. 8.2 months, hazard ratio (HR): 2.45; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.45-4.13; P=0.001, but not overall survival (OS) (15.5 vs. 20.7 months, HR: 1.33; 95{\%} CI: 0.76-2.35; P=0.32). High versus low HER3 expression (PFS: 7.1 vs. 8.8 months, HR: 1.11; 95{\%} CI: 0.82-1.50; P=0.50; OS: 19.8 vs. 21.1 months, HR: 0.95; 95{\%} CI: 0.70-1.30; P=0.75) and high compared with low HER2/neu expression (PFS: 7.7 vs. 8.0 months, HR: 1.07; 95{\%} CI: 0.71-1.60; P=0.75; OS: 16.6 vs. 21.1 months, HR: 1.13; 95{\%} CI: 0.75-1.71; P=0.57) did not influence outcome. High NRG1 expression was associated with inferior PFS in the FIRE-1 trial. We did not detect a prognostic impact of HER2/neu and HER3 overexpression in mCRC. The frequency of overexpression was comparable with other studies.